Neuroscience Program

Siddhartha Sikdar

Siddhartha Sikdar

Siddhartha Sikdar

Assistant Professor

Dr. Siddhartha Sikdar is an Assistant Professor with joint appointments in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Bioengineering. Dr. Sikdar is also a guest researcher with the Rehabilitation Medicine Department at the NIH Clinical Center. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle, in 2005. From 2005-2007, he was a Senior Fellow in Bioengineering at the University of Washington.

 

Dr. Sikdar’s Biomedical Imaging Laboratory at the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study conducts translational research involving novel applications of ultrasound imaging including the development of new ultrasound signal and image processing methods and imaging systems with applications in rehabilitation medicine, cardiovascular disease and neuroscience. Ongoing projects include investigation of the pathophysiology of myofascial trigger points associated with chronic neck pain syndromes, properties of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in carotid arteries and cerebrovascular hemodynamics in head and neck injuries. The Biomedical Imaging Laboratory is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Veterans Health Administration.

 

Recent Publications

  1. Ballyns J, Shah J, Gerber, L, Hammond J, Gebreab T, Sikdar S. Objective ultrasonic measures for characterizing myofascial trigger points associated with cervical pain. J Ultrasound Med. 2011 (in press).
  2. Lebiedowska M, Sikdar S, Eranki A, Garmirian L. Knee joint angular velocities and accelerations during the patellar tendon jerk. J Neuroscience Meth. 2011; 198:255-259.
  3. Sikdar S, Vaidya S, Dighe M, Kolokythas O, Kim JH, Beach KW, Kim Y. Doppler Vibrometry: Assessment of arterial stenosis using perivascular vibrations without lumen visualization. J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2009;20:1157-63. 
  4. Sikdar S, Shah JP, Gebreab T, Yen RH, Gilliams E, Danoff J, Gerber LH. Novel application of ultrasound technology to visualize and characterize myofascial trigger points and surrounding soft tissue. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009; 90:1829-38.